Thursday, 22 February 2018

FEBRUARY SCAVENGER PHOTO HUNT. (2018)



Joining in with the lovely Kate from "I live, I love, I craft, I am me", with a set of words & accompanying photos.

1.  WHITE.
The white kangaroos in the reserve at Bordertown.  I know I've shown them before, but couldn't resist for the colour white.

2.  METAL/METALLIC.
Metal relics at the freeway services in Gundagai (NSW), where you can stop for a cuppa to break a long journey.  This was taken in January on our way to Canberra.  Here you can also see the famous "Dog on a Tuckerbox".

3.  CAMOUFLAGE.
I struggled with this one.  Hope I'm not showing too many that have been on my blog before.  These silos are in the Western Districts of Victoria, where there are quite a few painted silos.  I am very much in awe of these, as the mind boggles as to how they are so accurate at such a huge size.  Not sure I've made sense with that.  This photo taken on our way home from Bordertown last July.

4.  BEGINS WITH A...............J
JALOPY.
The dictionary describes 'jalopy' as a dilapidated old vehicle & I think it suits this well.  Taken again on the above trip, but on hubby's phone when he spent a day at the Warracknabeal Agricultural Museum, doing his thing, whilst I was sewing with friends.

5.  BUD.
I love this photo of the magnolia buds, taken just as darkness was falling in late Autumn, many years ago at No. 4.  We'd had the magnolia for about 5 years & it had not flowered, but suddenly, at the wrong time of year, it was in full bud & flowered again that Spring.

6.  MY OWN CHOICE.
CONTORTIONIST????
I took this photo last Friday, whilst we were away in Geelong for a tiny break.  We spent a lovely day in our beloved Ballarat at the Botanic Gardens (& may I say a good half hour at Eureka Patchwork),
and wandered to our hearts content through the gardens, glass house and around the lake.  I captured this swan scratching away, with no regard to how it got it's head to where it wanted it to be.  A hoot to watch.

Well, that's my lot for this hunt & I've been a bit naughty with hunting through the archives.
I did manage to take some photos whilst away, but they will be for another post, along with some crafty finishes for another catch-up post.
Take care all & happy hunting to the other scavengers.
Huggles, Susan.


33 comments:

  1. I really want to go see those silos one day.. I agree, how do they make then so accurate.... xx

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    1. When you come home for good, we'll all go & see them.

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  2. I too, love the silos. Could they be the owners/workers? I wonder if they are photographic art?

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    1. Thanks. If I remember rightly, these ones are local farming identities & I've heard a few different versions of how they are done. You could look at the site Jayne (below) found on the web. I've a brochure, but can't seem to find it at the moment.

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  3. Welcome home, hope you enjoyed your time away.

    Well done with all the pictures, those silos are amazing. I was interested and found this: http://siloarttrail.com
    Expect you have seen it. Take care, x

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    1. Thanks Jayne & yes, I've seen the site & also have a brochure, that I must have put somewhere odd for safekeeping.(lol). Talk soon.

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  4. Great photos. I don't remember you showing the white kangaroos before but I wouldn't mind one bit anyway, you know I'm a big softie for any animals.

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    1. Thanks Jo. That photo would have been a couple of years ago, but then I know we are both softies for animals (giggle).

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  5. We passed through Gundagai on the bus coming from Melbourne to Canberra but didn't get time to get out and look around - I'd love to see it, especially the folk festival there. The silo art is wonderful and the white kangaroos - didn't know they existed ... Great photos Susan :) I don't think I' going to get a set of pics up - back in bed with a chesty flu and a gig to do tomorrow night!! just want to sleep.

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    1. Thanks Fil. Maybe one day you'll visit again & get to see more. Take care of yourself with lots of fluid & rest & there is always next month to join in. Huggles.

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  6. Lovely photos. The silo art is wonderful and the old jalopy, great to see the white kangaroos too:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie. I posted about the silos in June last year, with more photos.

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  7. Gteat interpretations. Loving the white kangeroos! My sister saw a white stoat on top of her wood shed the other day, here in the UK. They camaflage themselves in the winter. White animals always seem so magical. The Silo Art for camoflage is perfect and jalopy ~ what a great word!

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    1. Thanks Shazza. I too think white animals are magical & it took hubby to think of jalopy for my J. Have a good man, who is car mad & helps occasionally with my "words".

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  8. Great photos, Love the jalopy

    Julie xx

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  9. I love how everyone has a different interpretation on the list - that is what makes it such a delight to read each blog :) Jalopy - that is a word I have not heard for aaaaages! One from my childhood. Those silos are magnificent - glad you shared them :) The 'roos are they albino or are they white? - as in a form of leucism?

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    1. Thanks Kate. Your hunt is part of what keeps me blogging as then I can share my love of photography. K thought of Jalopy!!! The 'roos are white & not albino, which is why they are kept separate. Huggles.

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  10. Like everyone else I love the silo art. I wondered who the blokes were.... I thought they looked the type to be found propping up the bar at the local RSL. Going over to the silo art website now.

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    1. Thanks Fiona. Hope you found the site interesting, & although we've only seen 3 of them, we'd like to visit some more here in Victoria & South Australia.

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  11. Had the same thoughts when I read Jalopy. Lovely descriptive word from our past. Love your pictures especially the kangaroos and silos. Painting on that scale is amazing. xx

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    1. Thanks Carol. Seems like the word Jalopy has gone down well, although long forgotten by most.

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  12. Jalopy - now that is a word I've not heard in ages; thanks for reminding me about it. My Beloved would love to have that jalopy too but thankfully we are too far away! Never heard of white kangaroos before so thanks for educating me!

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    1. Is it our age group with that word! Hubby says it actually still goes. Beloved would have a ball over here with so many farms having vintage stuff lying around.

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  13. Sue ,well you can learn something new no matter how old, thankyou for your birthday wishes.I did not know there were white Kangaroos. The silo art so different great to hear
    the word Jalopy ,a blast from the past.

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    1. Thank you! I think, even though mine were mainly archived photos, that I've had more positive comments than before. Bring on next month's words & shhhh!, K's 70th.

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  14. Love the white kangaroos - I didn't even know white ones existed - and the contortionist black swan. I had to look twice to see what it was, I thought at first it was a turkey! :)

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    1. Thanks Eunice. I like to show a bit of the different things in this hunt that folks may not know about Oz, as most of the hunters are from UK. Take care.

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  15. A great collection, the white kanagroos are my favourite (I thought they were sheep at first!), having never seen a white kangaroo before.

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    1. Thanks Louise. We do have plenty of sheep in Oz, but not many of the white roos.

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  16. Its always good to see the perspective from the other side of the world. I tried taking swans for white but they were miserable pictures. But then you have the same Coots as us. But probably they were introduced by the Brits into Australia before anyone knew better.
    Those silos are quite something.
    Interesting set of photos, thanks.

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    1. Thanks John. Not sure whether they are coots, as I know them by the name of moorhens. Maybe I should look them up in my bird book. The silos really are amazing & I posted about them in June last year.

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